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We’re always on the look-out for the latest noteworthy negotiation news and commentary. We’ve aggregated the pertinent stories for your consideration so you can stay up-to-date on what’s happening in the world of negotiation.

Here are recent links of interest:

“”The Strategic Use Of Anger During Negotiations: It Doesn’t Work With East Asians” – Bob Sutton Work Matters

“Outline of the Core Steps in the Negotiation Process” – Bright Hub

“The Secrets of Power Negotiation” – Denise O’Berry

“The Nice Girl’s Guide to Negotiation” – BNET

“Is ‘negotiation’ the same as ‘dispute resolution?’” – Negotiation Space

“Trustworthy Facial Expressions Have Negative Impact on an Opponent’s Decision Making” – An Associate’s Mind

“A Body Language Secret: Look Below The Belt” – Forbes.com

“Negotiating Via E-mail?” – Business Tip

If you spot negotiation news of interest, or you have an interesting blog post you want to share, let us know at: info@mindedge.com.


MindEdge offers self-paced courses and simulations in business communications, management, and leadership.

Our courses are designed to engage and inform!

Please click on any of the following MindEdge online courses for more information:

You can learn more about MindEdge by clicking here.

Copyright © 2010 MindEdge

We’re always on the look-out for the latest noteworthy negotiation news and commentary. We’ve aggregated the pertinent stories for your consideration so you can stay up-to-date on what’s happening in the world of negotiation.

Here are recent links of interest:

“10 Musts for Becoming a Negotiation Ninja” – Youngentrepreneur

“Secret of Successful B2B Sales: Having Strong Negotiation Skills” – Drive Your Success

“Negotiation 101: introduction” – Finance, Business, and Personal Finance Article

“SALES : 10 Key Lessons on Negotiation – Negotiating Lessons” – Tech4buziness

“Clarity is a virtue” – Negotiation Space

“When Are the Negotiations Really Over?” – Ezine Articles

“6 Steps to Sizing Up a Negotiation” – HBR Management Tip of the Day

“Negotiating Your Salary During The Job Interview” – Career Me

“Helpful Negotiating Tips” – Wendy Patton’s Blog

“Quick Deals In Negotiations” – Negotiation Skills

If you spot negotiation news of interest, or you have an interesting blog post you want to share, let us know at: info@mindedge.com.


MindEdge offers self-paced courses and simulations in business communications, management, and leadership.

Our courses are designed to engage and inform!

Please click on any of the following MindEdge online courses for more information:

You can learn more about MindEdge by clicking here.

Copyright © 2010 MindEdge

We’re always on the look-out for the latest noteworthy negotiation news and commentary. We’ve aggregated the pertinent stories for your consideration so you can stay up-to-date on what’s happening in the world of negotiation.

Here are recent links of interest:

“A Few Great Negotiation Tricks You Can Use” – OPEN Forum

“You Can Always Get What You Want: Negotiate Like A Diplomat” – Small Business Money Tree

“Four Rules for Effective Negotiations” – HBR Blogs

“Negotiating Pay: How to Get a Better Offer” – CBS MoneyWatch.com

“Negotiation For Interview” – Jobswot

“What Makes a Great Business Negotiator” – Business Opportunities Blog

“Secrets of successful business negotiation” – CIO

“Negotiation Case Studies” – The Negotiation Experts

“Sex and Winning Business Negotiation” – 2 Chicks at Home

“Success Negotiating: How to Leave with More Than What You Wanted” – ArticleCity

If you spot negotiation news of interest, or you have an interesting blog post you want to share, let us know at: info@mindedge.com.


MindEdge offers self-paced courses and simulations in business communications, management, and leadership.

Our courses are designed to engage and inform!

Please click on any of the following MindEdge online courses for more information:

You can learn more about MindEdge by clicking here.

Copyright © 2010 MindEdge

We’re always on the look-out for the latest noteworthy negotiation news and commentary. We’ve aggregated the pertinent stories for your consideration so you can stay up-to-date on what’s happening in the world of negotiation.

Here are recent links of interest:

“The subtle art of negotiation “ – BBC News

“Killer Negotiation Tactics for Basically Nice People” – Small Business Money Tree

“Does your communication style affect your negotiation?” – Negotiation Space

“How to Size Up a Negotiation” – HBR Blogs

“The Top 5 Components of Preparing for a Negotiation” – Jan Potgieter’s Negotiation Skills Blog

“Negotiate a Pay Raise During a Recession? You Bet!” – Settle It Now Negotiation Blog

“Negotiating with Vendors” – Negotiation Board

“A Fun Negotiation Video I Came Across” – Charles’ Purchasing Certification Blog

“Game Theory, Negotiation, and the “Black Box” – Business Conflict Blog

“How To Negotiate Your Salary” – Forbes.com

If you spot negotiation news of interest, or you have an interesting blog post you want to share, let us know at: info@mindedge.com.


MindEdge offers self-paced courses and simulations in business communications, management, and leadership.

Our courses are designed to engage and inform!

Please click on any of the following MindEdge online courses for more information:

You can learn more about MindEdge by clicking here.

Copyright © 2010 MindEdge

BATNA stands for "best alternative to no agreement." This term was introduced by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton in the book, Getting to Yes. When a person goes into a negotiation knowing what their BATNA is, it can limit his or her course of action during  the negotiation.

Developing a BATNA

It is highly recommended that people develop a BATNA before engaging in a negotiation. Without taking the time to develop a BATNA, you will likely be unaware of what would happen if the negotiation fails. As a result, you may feel a strong inner pressure to reach an agreement, even if it is not in your best interests. Alternatively, you may feel overly optimistic about the proposed agreements. Your optimism may cloud your view of costs associated with the agreements.

There are seven basic steps to developing a BATNA:

  1. List what you will do if you fail to reach an agreement
  2. Convert the most promising options into practical choices
  3. Select the single best option (that becomes your BATNA)
  4. Compare your BATNA to all proposals
  5. If an offer is better than your BATNA, consider improving or accepting it
  6. If an offer is worse than your BATNA, consider rejecting it
  7. If the other party will not improve their offer, consider exercising your BATNA

One of the determinants of your power in a negotiation is the attractiveness of your BATNA as compared to the proposals made during the discussions.

  • The more attractive your BATNA is, compared with the proposals you receive, the more power you have in the negotiation.
  • The less attractive your BATNA is compared with the proposals, the less power you have in the negotiation.

Since there is a direct relationship between negotiating power and a good BATNA, it is important to improve your BATNA whenever possible.


Copyright © 2008 MindEdge

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Principled negotiation is a concept that is based on the book Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher and Bill Ury. This approach to negotiation focuses on the interests of the parties and emphasizes conflict management and conflict resolution.

Because the goal of principled negotiation is to find a mutually shared outcome, it is sometimes referred to as “win-win”. This represents a very different approach from the stereotypical view of a tough negotiation where one party will inevitably lose, while the other wins. (A win-win negotiation is one where the agreement cannot be improved by further discussions. There is no value left on the table and all creative options have been thoroughly explored.)

If we delve into principled negotiation in more detail, we find that there are four central guidelines to the approach:

  1. Separate people from the problem being negotiated. Issues should be decided on their merits, rather than being influenced by emotions or by the individuals who are involved.
  2. Focus on the negotiating parties’ interests, not their positions. The underlying interests or motivations that drive individuals in a negotiation are often quite similar. By focusing on interests, the parties may see that they are not as opposed as they thought they were initially. Any discussion about interests should offer concrete and specific details. This makes the interests more real and credible.
  3. Generate different options for mutual gain. Sometimes people will focus too narrowly when generating ideas. For example, they may judge the ideas during a brainstorming session, rather than simply proposing ideas and evaluating them later. Alternatively, parties may limit their focus to their own immediate interests. This stifles options that have appeal to all involved in the negotiation.
  4. Base the outcome from a principled negotiation session on objective criteria. For example, if two parties are involved in the purchase and sale of a house, certain objective criteria might be applied to the price, such as the recent sale prices of comparable homes in the area, adjustments for depreciation, or the opinion of an independent appraiser.

Principled negotiation is not right for all situations

The principled negotiation approach is most popular among academics and mediators. It is not often used in business negotiations. It is important to bear in mind that compromise is not the same as win-win. In a compromise situation, both parties make some sacrifices to find an agreeable outcome. With win-win, both parties achieve their desired outcomes, but neither sacrifices to do so.

Certain scenarios do not lend themselves to principled negotiation:

  • Instances where one party assumes a competitive strategy and is focused on winning at the other party’s expense.
  • Situations where negotiation involves a widely available commodity product that is either inexpensive or does not play a strategic role in the business.

Copyright © 2008 MindEdge

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Linda Babcock and Sara Leschever are authors of the book Ask For It: How Women Can Use the Power of Negotiation to Get What They Really Want. Journalist Lisa Summers recently interviewed them on women and pay raise negotiations.

Here is Summers’ Toronto Star article: “Want a raise? Ask for it”


Copyright © 2008 MindEdge

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Let’s say that you have decided to buy a used car. You and the salesman start haggling over the price. He wants you to pay as close to the asking price as possible. You, however, feel that there are certain aspects to the car which could spell trouble. You want to reduce the price by the amount of repairs that you think may be ahead of you. This scenario is an example of distributive negotiation.

Distributive negotiation is when two (or more) parties are trying to claim the maximum amount of value for themselves. In our used car sale example, the salesman wants to make the largest amount of money possible, while the buyer wants to pay the least amount of money possible. We might refer to this type of situation as a “fixed pie”. The focus is on individual gain—the parties will divide the pie and focus on getting as must as possible for themselves. This is different from situations where the parties try to make the entire pie bigger, so there is enough profit/gain and value to satisfy everyone. In a distributive negotiation, one negotiating party will inevitably lose something, and the other will gain as a result.

Distributive negotiations tend to be competitive interactions for several reasons. They are characterized by a win/lose outcome. In addition, the interests of the parties tend to be opposed. In the used car sale, the buyer and the seller do not have any shared interests. The seller wants to make the most money possible from the buyer, while the buyer wants to pay the least amount of money possible to the seller.

It is common for distributive negotiations to be used in situations where the people involved have never had a relationship, and are not likely to have one again in the near future. Without the presence of a short or long-term relationship, there is less concern about perceptions or reputation.


Copyright © 2008 MindEdge

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Scott Flegal is a business lawyer and mediator.

From the Nashua Telegraph, here is his article: “Do your homework before negotiating.”


Copyright © 2008 MindEdge

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Professor Seth Freeman of the Columbia Business School is an expert on negotiation and conflict management.

From his website betternegotiating.com, here is his article: “Five Minute Refresher – Is This Deal Necessary? How to Know To Say “No” to Bad Offers.”


Copyright © 2007 MindEdge

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